Blog

NBC’s Evolving Geographic Imagination: Revisiting Earlier Research with the 2016 Summer Olympics

Four years ago during the 2012 Summer Olympics, I worked with Emily Fekete to examine the Opening Ceremony’s “Parade of Nations.”  Because of the time difference between NBC’s audiences in the United States and the Games’ host city of London, the network “tape-delayed” the ceremony to show it during primetime viewing hours in the U.S., during which time the producers of the telecast significantly edited the event.  The result of these edits were the significant minimizing or near-exclusion of a number of delegations for the purpose of brevity and/or preservation of airtime for paid advertisements.

Continue reading “NBC’s Evolving Geographic Imagination: Revisiting Earlier Research with the 2016 Summer Olympics”

“Qualified”: When Political Discourse Makes Word Stew

 

I woke up this morning to find a rather inane debate raging on Twitter and elsewhere (not surprising, I know, but stay with me…).  Bernie Sanders, my current preferred choice for the Democratic presidential nomination, said in a speech that his opponent, Hillary Clinton, was “not qualified.”  These remarks were a direct response to Clinton’s suggestion that he was also not qualified.  Just another day in the mud bath of politics so hum, right? Continue reading ““Qualified”: When Political Discourse Makes Word Stew”

Final Drafts for Matthew Barlow’s Griffintown Book

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I’ve been uber-swamped of late with the non-mapping aspects of life, but I finally finished up maps of the Griffintown neighborhood for J. Matthew Barlow’s book, The House of the Irish:” Diaspora, History & Memory in Griffintown, Montreal, 1900-2010, forthcoming from the University of British Columbia Press.  More maps and brief discussion after the break…

Continue reading “Final Drafts for Matthew Barlow’s Griffintown Book”

Testing Pix4Dmapper for UAV-based 3D Modeling

The Department of Geosciences at Mansfield University recently approved the purchase of Pix4Dmapper, a software that renders 3D models photogrammetrically through a proprietary algorithm. What this means is that Pix4D can assemble an array of aerial images from a UAV to create a three-dimensional representation of the landscape photographed. This option is significantly cheaper and more accessible than using LiDAR or other 3D remote sensing technologies, and according to the DJI specs, should be nearly as accurate.  And happily, Pix4D also has a dedicated smartphone app that fully integrates with our DJI Phantom 2 Vision+ UAV, providing coverage assistance to the pilot, or offering fully automatic piloting specifically for mapping purposes. Continue reading “Testing Pix4Dmapper for UAV-based 3D Modeling”

3D Printing a Topo Map of Tioga County, Attempt One

Recently, I’ve been working with several MU Geosciences students to refine the method we’ve developed for 3D printing topographic maps from DEM files.  While printing topography isn’t necessarily new in and of itself, we wanted to create a method that we could publish for wide use, and wanted to ensure that the method is cartographically sound as well.  To fully refine the method, we’ve been experimenting with various aspects of 3D printing maps.  The first, after our proof-of-concept model that included only topography at 1:24,000 scale, was to print a complete map of Tioga County. Continue reading “3D Printing a Topo Map of Tioga County, Attempt One”

What Lt. Cmdr. Data Tells us About Star Trek’s Interpretation of Moore’s Law

It’s no secret that I’m a big fan of Star Trek. As someone who was largely a social outcast growing up, it was in some ways a default — Gene Roddenberry’s vision represents a future that is largely hopeful and where differences are accepted and encouraged within Federation’s society rather than intentionally muted, and that was a source of comfort. Continue reading “What Lt. Cmdr. Data Tells us About Star Trek’s Interpretation of Moore’s Law”

Drones and Society: A Presentation to the 2014 PA Digital Government Summit

On Friday, December 5, MU colleague Lee Stocks and I were honored to give an invited presentation to the 2014 Pennsylvania Digital Government Summit in Harrisburg.

Here are the slides from that presentation. Continue reading “Drones and Society: A Presentation to the 2014 PA Digital Government Summit”