Blog

OU Presentation on UAVs

This week, I was honored and privileged to give a couple of presentations to students and faculty in the Department of Geography and Environmental Sustainability at the University of Oklahoma in Norman. This is a presentation on using UAVs for mapping applications that I delivered to a remote sensing class on Tuesday.

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The Google App’s “Grand Canyon”: the Current State of Extended Knowledges and Voice+AI

I honestly don’t get exposed to as much advertising as most folks. Between AdBlock on my web browsers, no viewing of broadcast/cable television, a residence in a rural location with few billboards, and a life that is (generously stated) that of a “home body,” I just don’t see a lot of advertisements. Generally, that’s a positive thing — beyond not knowing anything about which movies are currently in the cinema, I don’t miss it AT ALL, and when I stay with someone or sleep in a hotel, I wonder how people can stand TV programming that’s 30% promotional. But, what this relative dearth of advertising in my life, I tend to more notice those pieces that sneak through the firewall.

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COPLAC 2014 URC Conference Posters

Three Mansfield University Geoscience undergraduate students presented their research at the COPLAC Northeast Regional Undergraduate Research Conference this past weekend at Keene State College in Keene, NH. I was the co-adviser of two of these projects, along with my colleague Lee Stocks. Continue reading “COPLAC 2014 URC Conference Posters”

Cave Densities in WV – Applied Geography Presentation

Here are the slides from the talk I co-presented with my Mansfield University colleague Lee Stocks at the 2014 Applied Geography Conference in Atlanta this past Thursday.

The presentation resulted in our paper being published in Papers in Applied Geography, volume 37. Continue reading “Cave Densities in WV – Applied Geography Presentation”

Resolution and Coverage Testing for Phantom 2 Vision+ UAV Imagery for Mapping

A few days back, I sent up our new DJI Phantom 2 Vision+ above the Mansfield football stadium for some imagery testing, and published a blog on doing lens corrections for mapping. Now, I’m going to take those corrected images to the next step and test their resolution and coverage to see how effective this equipment is for providing high-quality, high-resolution and low-cost remote sensing imagery for mapping applications. In a future post, I’ll be looking at how much distortion remained in the imagery after the lens correction process.

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Lens Correction on DJI Phantom 2 Vision+ for Mapping

The new prevalence and inexpensive nature of UAVs has given cartographers and spatial scientists a great new tool for creating extremely high-resolution (both spatial and temporal) maps of places. At Mansfield, we’ve got several platforms that we’re using — the latest acquisition is the midrange “prosumer” UAV, the DJI Phantom 2 Vision+. At less than $1,200 for a pretty incredible array of features, it’s a pretty good bargain (at least in the realm of scientific equipment, which generally has the same mark-up as illicit drugs) and a great place to start if you’re wanting to experiment with UAV mapping. Continue reading “Lens Correction on DJI Phantom 2 Vision+ for Mapping”

Fun with Maps: Resolution Test GIF

I took the Phantom 2 Vision+ out to do some resolution and lens correction testing this morning. Part of this required using the football field on campus, since it provides some nice measured straight-line geometry that can be used to gauge the resolution and correction to ensure accuracy. Continue reading “Fun with Maps: Resolution Test GIF”

Mapping Biomes for the Plaid Avenger: Adventures in Georectifying and Symbology

This summer, I’ve been enjoying doing some work for the Plaid Avenger, especially creating new maps for his next edition of The Plaid Avenger’s World, an excellent alternative textbook for world geography courses. Some of that work, particularly mapping biomes, has proven to be a bit of an adventure.

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Maps of History of Lake Agassiz Study

 

Lake Agassiz Reference

Continuing my sudden (apparent) interest in geology-related maps, here’re a few┬áI recently made for Beth Johnson, my former colleague at UW-Fox Valley, in her paper about the exploration and development of Lake Agassiz in historical geologic literature. Above is the reference map of Lake Agassiz, two different boundaries provided in literature, and outflow paths marked by capital letters. Continue reading “Maps of History of Lake Agassiz Study”

Restarting Amtrak’s System from Scratch

US Rail Map 1

I’ve always thought that Amtrak would really have a go at success if it had a more comprehensive network of routes and stations. It’s difficult as-is to get on a train and go anywhere in the U.S. That’s a problem because people don’t want to take the train just to have to drive five hours more upon arrival.

So, I messed around a bit, pretended that bullet trains were here, that topography didn’t matter, and that funding was unlimited, and came up with a new network plan for our rail system. Continue reading “Restarting Amtrak’s System from Scratch”

My AAG 2014 Talk: Quantum Geographies: Applying Einsteinian Space-Time, Metaphysics and Multiverse Theory to Four-Dimensional Interpretation of Places Memorializing Tragedy

This is my AAG talk, given this past Thursday afternoon. I’m only posting the slides because I did not write a full narrative for this talk. I think readers can generally follow from the slides below, though.

It was probably too ambitious for 15 minutes, and I don’t know if I’ll ever revisit this idea again, but it was still a fun talk to give.

Continue reading “My AAG 2014 Talk: Quantum Geographies: Applying Einsteinian Space-Time, Metaphysics and Multiverse Theory to Four-Dimensional Interpretation of Places Memorializing Tragedy”