NBC’s Evolving Geographic Imagination: Revisiting Earlier Research with the 2016 Summer Olympics

Four years ago during the 2012 Summer Olympics, I worked with Emily Fekete to examine the Opening Ceremony’s “Parade of Nations.”  Because of the time difference between NBC’s audiences in the United States and the Games’ host city of London, the network “tape-delayed” the ceremony to show it during primetime viewing hours in the U.S., during which time the producers of the telecast significantly edited the event.  The result of these edits were the significant minimizing or near-exclusion of a number of delegations for the purpose of brevity and/or preservation of airtime for paid advertisements.

Continue reading “NBC’s Evolving Geographic Imagination: Revisiting Earlier Research with the 2016 Summer Olympics”

Final Drafts for Matthew Barlow’s Griffintown Book

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I’ve been uber-swamped of late with the non-mapping aspects of life, but I finally finished up maps of the Griffintown neighborhood for J. Matthew Barlow’s book, The House of the Irish:” Diaspora, History & Memory in Griffintown, Montreal, 1900-2010, forthcoming from the University of British Columbia Press.  More maps and brief discussion after the break…

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Mapping Biomes for the Plaid Avenger: Adventures in Georectifying and Symbology

This summer, I’ve been enjoying doing some work for the Plaid Avenger, especially creating new maps for his next edition of The Plaid Avenger’s World, an excellent alternative textbook for world geography courses. Some of that work, particularly mapping biomes, has proven to be a bit of an adventure.

Continue reading “Mapping Biomes for the Plaid Avenger: Adventures in Georectifying and Symbology”

Maps of History of Lake Agassiz Study

 

Lake Agassiz Reference

Continuing my sudden (apparent) interest in geology-related maps, here’re a few I recently made for Beth Johnson, my former colleague at UW-Fox Valley, in her paper about the exploration and development of Lake Agassiz in historical geologic literature. Above is the reference map of Lake Agassiz, two different boundaries provided in literature, and outflow paths marked by capital letters. Continue reading “Maps of History of Lake Agassiz Study”

Restarting Amtrak’s System from Scratch

US Rail Map 1

I’ve always thought that Amtrak would really have a go at success if it had a more comprehensive network of routes and stations. It’s difficult as-is to get on a train and go anywhere in the U.S. That’s a problem because people don’t want to take the train just to have to drive five hours more upon arrival.

So, I messed around a bit, pretended that bullet trains were here, that topography didn’t matter, and that funding was unlimited, and came up with a new network plan for our rail system. Continue reading “Restarting Amtrak’s System from Scratch”

Re-Constructing the Map, Revisited: NBC’s Geographic Imagination in the 2014 Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony

A couple of years ago, during the Opening Ceremony of the 2012 Summer Olympics in London, I got the crazy idea to map seconds of coverage of each delegation when I saw NBC constantly cut away from lesser known countries after just a few seconds as compression editing for the tape-delayed broadcast. Continue reading “Re-Constructing the Map, Revisited: NBC’s Geographic Imagination in the 2014 Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony”