NBC’s Evolving Geographic Imagination: Revisiting Earlier Research with the 2016 Summer Olympics

Four years ago during the 2012 Summer Olympics, I worked with Emily Fekete to examine the Opening Ceremony’s “Parade of Nations.”  Because of the time difference between NBC’s audiences in the United States and the Games’ host city of London, the network “tape-delayed” the ceremony to show it during primetime viewing hours in the U.S., during which time the producers of the telecast significantly edited the event.  The result of these edits were the significant minimizing or near-exclusion of a number of delegations for the purpose of brevity and/or preservation of airtime for paid advertisements.

Continue reading “NBC’s Evolving Geographic Imagination: Revisiting Earlier Research with the 2016 Summer Olympics”

“Qualified”: When Political Discourse Makes Word Stew

 

I woke up this morning to find a rather inane debate raging on Twitter and elsewhere (not surprising, I know, but stay with me…).  Bernie Sanders, my current preferred choice for the Democratic presidential nomination, said in a speech that his opponent, Hillary Clinton, was “not qualified.”  These remarks were a direct response to Clinton’s suggestion that he was also not qualified.  Just another day in the mud bath of politics so hum, right? Continue reading ““Qualified”: When Political Discourse Makes Word Stew”

The Google App’s “Grand Canyon”: the Current State of Extended Knowledges and Voice+AI

I honestly don’t get exposed to as much advertising as most folks. Between AdBlock on my web browsers, no viewing of broadcast/cable television, a residence in a rural location with few billboards, and a life that is (generously stated) that of a “home body,” I just don’t see a lot of advertisements. Generally, that’s a positive thing — beyond not knowing anything about which movies are currently in the cinema, I don’t miss it AT ALL, and when I stay with someone or sleep in a hotel, I wonder how people can stand TV programming that’s 30% promotional. But, what this relative dearth of advertising in my life, I tend to more notice those pieces that sneak through the firewall.

Continue reading “The Google App’s “Grand Canyon”: the Current State of Extended Knowledges and Voice+AI”

My AAG 2014 Talk: Quantum Geographies: Applying Einsteinian Space-Time, Metaphysics and Multiverse Theory to Four-Dimensional Interpretation of Places Memorializing Tragedy

This is my AAG talk, given this past Thursday afternoon. I’m only posting the slides because I did not write a full narrative for this talk. I think readers can generally follow from the slides below, though.

It was probably too ambitious for 15 minutes, and I don’t know if I’ll ever revisit this idea again, but it was still a fun talk to give.

Continue reading “My AAG 2014 Talk: Quantum Geographies: Applying Einsteinian Space-Time, Metaphysics and Multiverse Theory to Four-Dimensional Interpretation of Places Memorializing Tragedy”

My alt.conf talk: The Age of Cartographic Impressionism

I actually did finish this around six hours ago, but… I can’t sleep.  So, I’m going to go ahead and post my first AAG talk here, a lightning session for the GeoWeb and Big Data alt.conf I helped to organize. Continue reading “My alt.conf talk: The Age of Cartographic Impressionism”

Re-Constructing the Map, Revisited: NBC’s Geographic Imagination in the 2014 Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony

A couple of years ago, during the Opening Ceremony of the 2012 Summer Olympics in London, I got the crazy idea to map seconds of coverage of each delegation when I saw NBC constantly cut away from lesser known countries after just a few seconds as compression editing for the tape-delayed broadcast. Continue reading “Re-Constructing the Map, Revisited: NBC’s Geographic Imagination in the 2014 Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony”

Re-Constructing the Map: NBC’s Geographic Imagination and the Opening Ceremony for the 2012 London Olympics

Note: This is a paper, co-authored with Emily Fekete at the University of Kansas, which was inspired by a much earlier blog entry. It was accepted for publication by Sociological Research Online, and this page will “go dark” upon final publication in SRO.

Continue reading “Re-Constructing the Map: NBC’s Geographic Imagination and the Opening Ceremony for the 2012 London Olympics”

CFP – Future Directions in Geoweb Research: an alt.conference of Big Data, Theory and Geography’s Role

We’d like to call attention to the unique format we are able to facilitate. We’re encouraging submissions for short lightning talk panels that do not interfere with your ability to present more substantial papers at the AAG.

The lightning talks are organized by theme and will then be discussed by panelists including Rob Kitchin, Nadine Schuurman, Matt Wilson, Matt Zook, Jeremy Crampton, Monica Stephens, Mark Graham, David O’Sullivan, Agnieszka Leszczynski, Renee Sieber, and others.

The purpose of the alt.conference is to give an opportunity for younger scholars to receive immediate feedback and begin discussions with more senior researchers. Contributions will then be solicited for potential inclusion in an edited volume.

Consider submitting a short talk and encouraging others to do so as well.

Continue reading “CFP – Future Directions in Geoweb Research: an alt.conference of Big Data, Theory and Geography’s Role”

WLDAAG / ELDAAG Presentation on Fatness

In October 2012, I gave this presentation, entitled “Using Autoethnographic Methods to Understand the Impact of Fatness on Space and Place” at the 2012 Joint Meeting of the West Lakes and East Lakes Division of the AAG at Northern Illinois University in DeKalb, Illinois.

This is part of my larger research project on my personal geography of fatness. Continue reading “WLDAAG / ELDAAG Presentation on Fatness”

My Geography of Fatness: Recreation & Vacation

Ah, summertime. Summer’s a great season for having fun, being outside, traveling, and just generally recreating, especially when one’s in an academic position that leaves most of that time relatively free. Of course, as with any profession, it’s important that I take advantage of my time off by spending some of that time relaxing so that I can be productive and happy when I return to work. Continue reading “My Geography of Fatness: Recreation & Vacation”

NBC’s Geographic Imagination, as Reflected in the Olympics Opening Ceremony

A lot has been said about the incredibly sub-par coverage provided by NBC during the Opening Ceremonies of the 2012 Summer Olympics in London. Between their questionable decision to tape-delay the ceremony to coincide with prime time to maximize ratings to the many, many omissions from the rather bland, unsurprisingly free-of-colonialism ceremony on the U.S. broadcast — including, quite offensively, a tribute to the 7/7 tube bombings that occurred the day after London’s winning of the games was announced (see the tribute here). Also omitted: a tribute to the Sex Pistols, several music performances (which reviews called outstanding) and more. Instead, they showed a god-awful interview with Michael Phelps, a notably prolific swimmer who, quite frankly, has the personality of a broken toaster oven. Continue reading “NBC’s Geographic Imagination, as Reflected in the Olympics Opening Ceremony”