Cave Densities in WV – Applied Geography Presentation

Here are the slides from the talk I co-presented with my Mansfield University colleague Lee Stocks at the 2014 Applied Geography Conference in Atlanta this past Thursday.

The presentation resulted in our paper being published in Papers in Applied Geography, volume 37. Continue reading “Cave Densities in WV – Applied Geography Presentation”

My AAG 2014 Talk: Quantum Geographies: Applying Einsteinian Space-Time, Metaphysics and Multiverse Theory to Four-Dimensional Interpretation of Places Memorializing Tragedy

This is my AAG talk, given this past Thursday afternoon. I’m only posting the slides because I did not write a full narrative for this talk. I think readers can generally follow from the slides below, though.

It was probably too ambitious for 15 minutes, and I don’t know if I’ll ever revisit this idea again, but it was still a fun talk to give.

Continue reading “My AAG 2014 Talk: Quantum Geographies: Applying Einsteinian Space-Time, Metaphysics and Multiverse Theory to Four-Dimensional Interpretation of Places Memorializing Tragedy”

WLDAAG / ELDAAG Presentation on Fatness

In October 2012, I gave this presentation, entitled “Using Autoethnographic Methods to Understand the Impact of Fatness on Space and Place” at the 2012 Joint Meeting of the West Lakes and East Lakes Division of the AAG at Northern Illinois University in DeKalb, Illinois.

This is part of my larger research project on my personal geography of fatness. Continue reading “WLDAAG / ELDAAG Presentation on Fatness”

My Geography of Fatness: Recreation & Vacation

Ah, summertime. Summer’s a great season for having fun, being outside, traveling, and just generally recreating, especially when one’s in an academic position that leaves most of that time relatively free. Of course, as with any profession, it’s important that I take advantage of my time off by spending some of that time relaxing so that I can be productive and happy when I return to work. Continue reading “My Geography of Fatness: Recreation & Vacation”

NBC’s Geographic Imagination, as Reflected in the Olympics Opening Ceremony

A lot has been said about the incredibly sub-par coverage provided by NBC during the Opening Ceremonies of the 2012 Summer Olympics in London. Between their questionable decision to tape-delay the ceremony to coincide with prime time to maximize ratings to the many, many omissions from the rather bland, unsurprisingly free-of-colonialism ceremony on the U.S. broadcast — including, quite offensively, a tribute to the 7/7 tube bombings that occurred the day after London’s winning of the games was announced (see the tribute here). Also omitted: a tribute to the Sex Pistols, several music performances (which reviews called outstanding) and more. Instead, they showed a god-awful interview with Michael Phelps, a notably prolific swimmer who, quite frankly, has the personality of a broken toaster oven. Continue reading “NBC’s Geographic Imagination, as Reflected in the Olympics Opening Ceremony”

US That Could’ve Been: Creating Timeline X’s Map with GIS

I’ve been dabbling around with an alternate historical geography of the United States that I’ve called “The United States That Could’ve Been.” So far, I’ve laid out the initial concept map of the altered U.S., and I’ve drafted an alternate timeline of events, called “Timeline X,” which is almost certain to be updated and improved upon a little later. I decided that I’d like to go a few more steps with this and create some bare basic demographic analyses in a GIS, and perhaps put together a little almanac with entries about each of the states. To start, I decided to use existing data from these places just to see, assuming that all other migration events and such else remained largely the same in Timeline X as it did in our reality, what the populations of these new states would be. Continue reading “US That Could’ve Been: Creating Timeline X’s Map with GIS”

US That Could’ve Been: Building Timeline X

This past December, I put together a sort of alternate history map of the United States called “The United States …That Could’ve Been.” It was nothing more than just a bit of fun in a dull and dry winter spell. All of the states created in that entry were based on existing real-life partition proposals that were either flat-out rejected or which flamed out. Continue reading “US That Could’ve Been: Building Timeline X”

My Geography of Fatness: Air Travel

This is the third entry of a series focusing on my personal, autobiographical geography of fatness. To learn more about this project, check out the introduction entry, which should give you what you need to get started. I’ve also posted an entry on general socializing. Continue reading “My Geography of Fatness: Air Travel”

My Geography of Fatness: Socializing

This is the third second entry of a series focusing on my personal, autobiographical geography of fatness. To learn more about this project, check out the introduction entry, which should give you what you need to get started. Continue reading “My Geography of Fatness: Socializing”

My Geography of Fatness: Introduction

I’ve been often fascinated by the various Geography of Obesity posts and infographics, and even journal articles that have floated around Twitter and other social networks over the past few years. Indeed, fatness has become something of a hot-button issue, getting plenty of coverage in various news outlets because of social costs. With the prevention of childhood obesity becoming a major part of First Lady Michelle Obama’s agenda and with 2/3 of Americans considered obese or overweight, it’s not likely to go away anytime soon. Continue reading “My Geography of Fatness: Introduction”