3D Printing a Topo Map of Tioga County, Attempt One

Recently, I’ve been working with several MU Geosciences students to refine the method we’ve developed for 3D printing topographic maps from DEM files.  While printing topography isn’t necessarily new in and of itself, we wanted to create a method that we could publish for wide use, and wanted to ensure that the method is cartographically sound as well.  To fully refine the method, we’ve been experimenting with various aspects of 3D printing maps.  The first, after our proof-of-concept model that included only topography at 1:24,000 scale, was to print a complete map of Tioga County. Continue reading “3D Printing a Topo Map of Tioga County, Attempt One”

Cave Densities in WV – Applied Geography Presentation

Here are the slides from the talk I co-presented with my Mansfield University colleague Lee Stocks at the 2014 Applied Geography Conference in Atlanta this past Thursday.

The presentation resulted in our paper being published in Papers in Applied Geography, volume 37. Continue reading “Cave Densities in WV – Applied Geography Presentation”

Mapping Biomes for the Plaid Avenger: Adventures in Georectifying and Symbology

This summer, I’ve been enjoying doing some work for the Plaid Avenger, especially creating new maps for his next edition of The Plaid Avenger’s World, an excellent alternative textbook for world geography courses. Some of that work, particularly mapping biomes, has proven to be a bit of an adventure.

Continue reading “Mapping Biomes for the Plaid Avenger: Adventures in Georectifying and Symbology”

My alt.conf talk: The Age of Cartographic Impressionism

I actually did finish this around six hours ago, but… I can’t sleep.  So, I’m going to go ahead and post my first AAG talk here, a lightning session for the GeoWeb and Big Data alt.conf I helped to organize. Continue reading “My alt.conf talk: The Age of Cartographic Impressionism”

Re-Constructing the Map, Revisited: NBC’s Geographic Imagination in the 2014 Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony

A couple of years ago, during the Opening Ceremony of the 2012 Summer Olympics in London, I got the crazy idea to map seconds of coverage of each delegation when I saw NBC constantly cut away from lesser known countries after just a few seconds as compression editing for the tape-delayed broadcast. Continue reading “Re-Constructing the Map, Revisited: NBC’s Geographic Imagination in the 2014 Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony”

Re-Constructing the Map: NBC’s Geographic Imagination and the Opening Ceremony for the 2012 London Olympics

Note: This is a paper, co-authored with Emily Fekete at the University of Kansas, which was inspired by a much earlier blog entry. It was accepted for publication by Sociological Research Online, and this page will “go dark” upon final publication in SRO.

Continue reading “Re-Constructing the Map: NBC’s Geographic Imagination and the Opening Ceremony for the 2012 London Olympics”

Vernacular Region of “Up North,” Wisconsin

Since moving to Wisconsin over a year ago, I’ve been trying to learn as much about the local topynymy and places of interest. One place that’s come up repeatedly when talking to students is “Up North,” referring to the relatively sparsely settled northern portion of the state. This “Up North” area is important to Wisconsin’s tourist economy and cultural identity. Many Wisconsin residents own property in the region, specifically to support their recreational pursuits. Continue reading “Vernacular Region of “Up North,” Wisconsin”

NBC’s Geographic Imagination, as Reflected in the Olympics Opening Ceremony

A lot has been said about the incredibly sub-par coverage provided by NBC during the Opening Ceremonies of the 2012 Summer Olympics in London. Between their questionable decision to tape-delay the ceremony to coincide with prime time to maximize ratings to the many, many omissions from the rather bland, unsurprisingly free-of-colonialism ceremony on the U.S. broadcast — including, quite offensively, a tribute to the 7/7 tube bombings that occurred the day after London’s winning of the games was announced (see the tribute here). Also omitted: a tribute to the Sex Pistols, several music performances (which reviews called outstanding) and more. Instead, they showed a god-awful interview with Michael Phelps, a notably prolific swimmer who, quite frankly, has the personality of a broken toaster oven. Continue reading “NBC’s Geographic Imagination, as Reflected in the Olympics Opening Ceremony”

US That Could’ve Been: Creating Timeline X’s Map with GIS

I’ve been dabbling around with an alternate historical geography of the United States that I’ve called “The United States That Could’ve Been.” So far, I’ve laid out the initial concept map of the altered U.S., and I’ve drafted an alternate timeline of events, called “Timeline X,” which is almost certain to be updated and improved upon a little later. I decided that I’d like to go a few more steps with this and create some bare basic demographic analyses in a GIS, and perhaps put together a little almanac with entries about each of the states. To start, I decided to use existing data from these places just to see, assuming that all other migration events and such else remained largely the same in Timeline X as it did in our reality, what the populations of these new states would be. Continue reading “US That Could’ve Been: Creating Timeline X’s Map with GIS”

US That Could’ve Been: Building Timeline X

This past December, I put together a sort of alternate history map of the United States called “The United States …That Could’ve Been.” It was nothing more than just a bit of fun in a dull and dry winter spell. All of the states created in that entry were based on existing real-life partition proposals that were either flat-out rejected or which flamed out. Continue reading “US That Could’ve Been: Building Timeline X”